The London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and

❰Ebook❯ ➧ The London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science Vol 34 Author David Brewster – Itelemedicine.pro Excerpt from The London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science Vol 34 January June 1849Mr A Smith on the Calculation of the Distance of a Shooting Star eclipsed in the EartExcerpt from The London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science Vol 34 January June 1849Mr A Smith on the Calculation of the Distance of a Shooting Star eclipsed in the Earth's ShadowAbout the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of.

Rare and classic books Find at wwwforgottenbookscomThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work Forgotten Books uses state of the art technology to digitally reconstruct the work preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy.

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The London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and

The London Edinburgh and Dublin Philosophical Magazine and See this thread for informationSir David Brewster KH PRSE FRS FSAScot FSSA MICE was a Scottish scientist inventor author and academic administrator In science he is principally remembered for his experimental work in physical optics mostly concerned with the study of the polarization of light and including the discovery of Brewster's angle He studied the birefringence of crystals under compression and discovered photoelasticity thereby creating the field of optical mineralogyBrewster was born at Jedburgh where his father a teacher was rector of the grammar school At the age of twelve he was sent to the University of Edinburgh being intended for the clergy However he had already shown a strong inclination for natural science and this had been fostered by his intimacy with a self taught philosopher astronomer and mathematician as Sir Walter Scott called him of great local fame—James Veitch of Inchbonny who was skilful in making telescopesAmong the non scientific public his fame spread effectually by his rediscovery in about 1815 of the kaleidoscope for which there was a great demand in both the United Kingdom and the United States An instrument of greater interest the stereoscope which though of much later date 1849 – 1850 and along with the kaleidoscope did than anything else to popularize his name was not as has often been asserted the invention of Brewster Sir Charles Wheatstone discovered its principle and applied it as early as 1838 to the construction of a cumbersome but effective instrument in which the binocular pictures were made to combine by means of mirrors Brewster's contribution was the suggestion to use lenses for uniting the dissimilar pictures and accordingly the lenticular stereoscope may fairly be said to be his inventionA much valuable and practical result of Brewster's optical researches was the improvement of the British lighthouse system Although Fresnel who had also the satisfaction of being the first to put it into operation perfected the dioptric apparatus independently Brewster was active earlier in the field than Fresnel describing the dioptric apparatus in 1812 He pressed its adoption on those in authority at least as early as 1820 two years before Fresnel suggested it and it was finally introduced into lighthouses mainly through his persistent effortsIn estimating his place among scientific discoverers the chief thing to be borne in mind is that his genius was not characteristically mathematical His method was empirical and the laws that he established were generally the result of repeated experiment To the ultimate explanation of the phenomena with which he dealt he contributed nothing and it is noteworthy although he did not maintain to the end of his life the corpuscular theory he never explicitly adopted the wave theory of light In addition to the various works of Brewster already mentioned the following may be added Notes and Introduction to Carlyle's translation of Legendre's Elements of Geometry 1824 Treatise on Optics 1831 Letters on Natural Magic addressed to Sir Walter Scott 1832 The Martyrs of Science or the Lives of Galileo Tycho Brahe and Kepler1841 More Worlds than One 1854source Wikipedia

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